Blog Post 7.5: Passages for Friday’s Class

Hi all,

Here’s a thread for material for tomorrow’s class — remember that we’ll be focusing on both Poschardt and Miller/Spooky:

By class time Friday, you should post in this thread a passage (roughly 2-4 sentences) from the reading for Friday that you find particularly interesting, surprising, inspiring, problematic, or otherwise significant. Remember to cite the page number for your passage. Also, it’s been great to have people posting songs, videos, etc., here, so more of that is very much welcome (although not required) — if there’s an example or other point of reference you want to bring in, go for it!

17 thoughts on “Blog Post 7.5: Passages for Friday’s Class”

  1. “By creating an analogical structure of sounds based on collage, with myself as the only common denominator, the sounds come to represent me… Any sound can be you“ (Miller 24)

    I still make mix CDs, and whenever I play one in my weight training class, I feel like every remark about the music is directed at me. However, I can’t exactly share them in a convenient way on the blog, so… sorry.

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  2. “Rhythm science is performed in a place where consciousness itself becomes an object of ‘material memory’. The spread of global networks of all sort (information distribution systems, mail systems, direct satellite broadcasting) have created phonographs and telephonies unprecedented in human history. We are witnessing and listening to the complete integration of and simultaneous representation of the human world as a single conscious entity based on the implosion of geographic distance or cartographic failure” (Miller, 71-72).

    Modern pop remix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNzrwh2Z2hQ

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  3. “But there’s something about the labor or writing and the sense of being part of the continuum of writing that goes back thousands of years. It is an ancient form, and in some ways it doesn’t quite fit what’s happening. The challenge then is to describe or characterize what it feels like to be alive now in the midst of it, but using this other mode of communication” (Miller 57).

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  4. “Making a mix CD is a paradox: it’s personal and impersonal, kind of like watching TV using time-shifting software to determine which commercials to cut and which to leave, or like assessing what chess moves to make when you’re playing solitaire. Think of downloading your own MP3 file. What sounds would you choose if they were all free?” (Miller, 29)

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  5. “Hip-hop is always innovative and it can absorb almost anything. This is not to deny that there are boundaries about how new sounds can be spread. When people are faced with conditions where “conservatives” control the zone, they have to innovate to get their message out, but innovation leads to constant elevation. It’s less Social Darwinism than a cooperative model of how infomration spreads in the hothouse enviirnonment of net dulture where “newness” is celebrated with how many people check in on the information” (Miller 64).

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  6. “If I internalize the environment around me, who is going to control how the information eventually surfaces? It’s an uncanny situation, the creative act becomes the dispersion of self” (Miller 28)

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  7. “One of the most important contemporary forms of composition, collage, moved into pop music. But where Dada attempted the ‘destruction of all meaning to absolute nonsense’, and where collage, through to the punk dada revival, was used principally for the destruction of old structures of meaning, hip-hop and the early disco DJ worked with sound clips without any destructive impulse. The old song is taken to pieces because parts of itself can be better used in the context of the DJ’s creation, not because the original song is not valued or has to be destroyed” (Poschardt 163).

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  8. “The order is like ‘bring people in, open ’em up…show ’em that alchemy flow…and break it down again.’ That’s why I always think of Dj-ing as a crossroads: the virtual style of a culture threaded through fiber optic cables, network systems, the here and now flipped into cipher mode. The code of the new streets, y’all – it’s digital. I don’t really cook, but I can use a microwave…” (Miller 28)

    I found myself watching a video after the Brett Gaylor video called “Everything is a Remix Cast Study: The iPhone.” This video discusses how most of the iPhone’s interface influences mimic and were taken from basic objects that we use everyday. For example, the device lock is similar to a latch, the keyboard animation is modeled after a typewriter and so on and so fourth…I’m not sure what I think about the video, but it is definitely food for thought. and figured it was worth posting:

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  9. “Saying that people are literate means that they have read widely enough to reference texts, to put them in a conceptual framework. They are capable of creating an overview. This kind of literacy exists in the musical area, too. The more you have heard, the easier it is to find links and to recognize quotations (Miller 56).

    This reminds me of the conversation about context that we have been having and how sometimes you need to understand the context to understand a piece of art or a song.

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  10. “Writing may be a little retro, but that’s cool, too. That’s why people still wear bell-bottom jeans. You can always squeeze something out of the past and make it become new.” (56)

    In lieu of others posting interesting stuff they’re finding, here’s an article people might find interesting. It’s an urban planner who appropriated a pic of Michelle Obama that an artist posted on her Instagram and it further discusses the same types of convos we’ve been having in class so far.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/05/the-indignities-of-remix-culture/525129/

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  11. “Who controls the environment you grew up in? Who controls the situation with which you engage? At the end of the day, it’s all about reprocessing the world around you.” (Miller 27)

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  12. “Music is always a metaphor. It’s an open signifier, an invisible, utterly malleable material. It’s not fixed or cast in stone. Rhythm science uses an endless recontextualizating as a core compositional strategy, and some of this generations most important artists continually remind us that there are innumerable ways to arrange the mix, ” (Miller 21).

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  13. “Sampling allows people to replay their own memories of the sounds and situations of their lives. Who controls the environment who grew up in? Who controls the situation with which you engage? At the end of the day, it’s all about reprocessing the world the world around you, and this will happen no matter how hard entertainment conglomerates and an older generation of artists tries to control these processes” (Milner 27).

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  14. we are witnessing and listening to the complete integration and simultaneous representation of the human world as a single conscious entity based on the implosion of geographic distance or cartographic failure
    miller 72

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  15. “Just as disco supported the revolts of the sexual body, it was now the revolts of Afro-Americans which, in this form of ghetto culture their supremacy over their body and its poetics.” (Poschardt 166)

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  16. “Sampling is a new way of doing something that’s been with us for a long time: creating with found objects. The rotation gets thick. The constraints get thin. The mix breaks free of the old associations. New contexts form from old. The script gets flipped. The languages evolve and learn to speak in new forms, new thoughts. The sound of thought becomes legible again at the edge of the new meanings.” (Miller, 25)

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  17. “Today’s notion of creativity and originality are configured by velocity: it is a blur, a constellation of styles, a knowledge and pleasure in the play of surfaces, a rejection of history as objective force in favor of subjective interpretations of its residue, a relish for copies and repetition, and so on.” (Miller 76)

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