Blog Post 3.5: Passages for Friday’s Class

Hi everyone,

Here’s a thread for Friday’s readings: you should read Milner’s chapter “Voice” in the packet and listen to parts of two podcasts from Reply All: this one up to about 21:00, and this one from about 15:00 until the end. You can listen to these through Spotify  as well if you prefer, but the podcast’s actual pages have links to some other content that provides useful context and explanation.

By class time Friday, you should post in this thread a passage (roughly 2-4 sentences) from one of these sources that you find particularly interesting, surprising, inspiring, problematic, or otherwise significant (meme formats are welcome but not required). Remember to cite the page number for your passage if it’s relevant.

20 thoughts on “Blog Post 3.5: Passages for Friday’s Class”

  1. “Vibrant public conversation depends on more voices having access to channels of interaction, and that’s what memetic media provide. Of course, participation in the memetic lingua franca is not wholly open, as this participation is bound both by cultural context and material inequalities. However, the structure is decidedly more polyvocal–more the realm of ‘the people’–than narrow one-to-many modes of mass mediated communication.” (Milner, 159)

    Like

  2. p. 155 “If more people holding more perspectives can log onto Reddit or Tumblr and engage in political expression and discussion, democracy benefits. The marginalized can use these media to engage in public conversation on more equal footing. Memetic logics – at their worst when they facilitate antagonistic silence – are at their most vibrant when they facilitate open, polyvocal public conversation. “

    Like

  3. “And this interrelationship can facilitate vast public conversation. As the popular intertwines with the populist in public commentary, participants can make assertions about the social and political issues that resonate with them. Because they facilitate polyvocal participation, pop reappropriations have political potential beyond ‘mere’ entertainment” (Milner 156).

    Like

  4. “Memes, as micro-actions of media remixing and sharing, are particularly important in a censored, propagandized state, which seeks first to isolate individuals who express opinions contrary to state interests, and then to deaden the sort of public debate that fosters a diverse sphere of opinion. With rich visual language and a culture of creative remix and communal participation, meme culture has provided an outlet for new forms of public conversation and community building” (An Xiao Mina qtd. Milner 159).

    Like

  5. “Participatory media of the sort that carried resonant OWS messaging in September 2011, even as traditional media outlets ignored the movement, can facilitate active, polyvocal citizenship. If more people holding more perspectives can log onto Reddit or Tumblr and engage in political expression and discussion, democracy benefits. The marginalized can use these media to engage in public conversation on more equal footing. Memetic logics– at their worst when they facilitate antagonistic silence– are at their most vibrant when the facilitate open, polyvocal public conversation” (155).

    Like

  6. “Memetic media are not, after all, predetermined in content, form, or stance. They do not have a prescribed purpose. Rather, they are a vernacular mode of public conversation; they ‘re dependent on everyday creative expression that can be brought into service for leisure entertainment, for directed activism, and for a whole range of intentions in between” (Milner, 164).

    Like

  7. “As the popular intertwines with the populist in public commentary, participants can make assertions about the social and political issues that resonate with them. Because they facilitate polyvocal participation, pop reappropriations have political potential beyond ‘mere’ entertainment.” (Milner 156).

    Like

  8. “While participatory media can inspire polyvocal engagement with public issues, they also provide enough customizable information to allow users to find whatever they want whenever they want it… Individuals can create their own metaphoric giant room where they shout an opinion and hear the same opinion right back.” (Milner, 174)

    Like

  9. “Memetic logics opened up the argument to new discussants and new means of discussing, as divergent camps used memetic media to comment and debate. Vibrant public conversations about the movement and its centrals emerged as discursive strands intertwined” p 154

    Like

  10. “Because they facilitate polyvocal participation, pop reappropriations have political potential beyond “mere” entertainment…. Pop culture might be a fine enough inspiration for reaction GIFs, but the stakes may be higher for public protest” (Milner 156/157)

    Like

  11. “Memes, as micro-actions of media remixing and sharing, are particularly important in a censored, propagandized state, which seeks first to isolate individuals who express opinions contrary to state interests, and then to deaden the sort of public debate that fosters a diverse sphere of opinion… meme culture has provided an outlet for new forms of public conversation and community building” (Mina, qtd. in Milner, 139).

    Like

  12. “Through this conversation and community building, memetic media inspire hope for broader discussion. Populist messages and popular means facilitate and amplify public voice. Like populism, popular culture – in its most favorable readings – encourages participation in public conversation” (Milner 159).

    Like

  13. “Memetic media can indeed facilitate vibrant polyvocal participation, and our public conversations are stronger when they do” (Milner, 156)
    “Pop culture reappropriations used in political discourse may be nothing more than the dumbed-down, imitative patch discussed in Chapter 2, a commercial distraction unfit for the hallowed practice of civil talk.” (Milner, 157)

    Like

  14. “By their very nature, memetic media house the potential for populist expression and conversation. Vibrant public conversation depends on more voices having access to channels of interaction, and that’s what memetic media provides.” (159)

    Like

  15. From Reply All: Episode #77 The Grand Tapestry of Pepe

    “Like if I go on Twitter right now and search for someone, like a white nationalist, … This user’s got Pepe smoking a joint and holding a Kalashnikov as his profile picture. And his Twitter bio says, ‘Race realist, Southern white nationalist, Nativist, defender of Dixie, First Amendment and traditional values.’ That’s not so much shitposting, that’s laying out their ideology.”

    Like

  16. “Jay-Z’s trouble came, though, when allegations surfaced that Rocawear was not donating any of the proceeds from the shirt to the OWS cause. The brand’s appropriation – perceived as purely commercial and therefore absent any political teeth – met resistance, which eventually led to the shirt’s removal from the Rocawear site. In this case, opportunistic pop culture appropriation attempted to restyle public activism into a commercial endeavor, and ultimately failed on both counts.” (Milner, 162)

    Here is a meme I found that I think is relevant to this quote https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1_dIO0NyrOsV09oNWdiOXdOMmc

    Like

  17. “I found out when [the Anti-defamation League] just announced it, nobody on their end reached out to me or anything. Which is weird because they included my name in the hate definition there” (In The Tall Grass 20:57).

    Like

  18. “By employing memetic logics, public participants can create, circulate, and transform texts in the name of political expression. And these expressions are not restricted to those who own large platforms or have large audiences. Instead, the vernacular creativity essential to YouTube videos, Twitter trending topics, and Reddit Photoshops depends on memetic participation situated outside of constricted media gatekeepers.” (Milner, 159-160.)

    Like

  19. “Memetic logics that foster civic talk –no matter the form–are a net win for public voice and for democracy in turn,” (169). “At the height of the OWS protests in the fall of 2011, citizens with a wide range of opinions employed memetic logis in their public conversations with a wide range of opinions employed memetic logics in their public conversations about the movement, evidencing polyvocality in the process” (170).

    Like

  20. In a boomerang effect, the wealth of public conversation on sites like Twitter, Reddit, Tumblr, and YouTube might lead users to seek and engage only opinion-confirming information. Individuals can create their own metaphoric giant room where they shout an opinion and hear the same opinion bounce right back.” (174)

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: